Monitoring Comprehension Lesson Plan with Stellaluna

Monitoring Comprehension – Making Tracks of our Inner Voice when Reading, Grade 2

Anonymous Classmate

Darlene Achee

 

Introduction

FollowingStrategies that Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement  by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis, the lesson will teach students how to track their thinking when reading.  Students will develop strategies to connect to their reading, improving understanding and construction of meaning.  Knowledge of the book is not necessary to follow this lesson.

Pre-requisite Knowledge

The students will have learned expectations of how to turn and speak with their neighbor, while staying on task.  There are no other prerequisites.  If children cannot write, they can draw pictures to illustrate their thoughts or discuss their thinking with others.  If students cannot read, he/she can listen to a teacher, audiotape, peer, or other person capable of reading.  The alternatives to writing and reading serve as accommodations as well.

TEKS

2.3  Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed.  Students are expected to:

C.  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

Objectives

At the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • Use  strategy “leave  tracks of  thinking”  to build reading comprehension
  • Engage with a story through connections and questions
  • Communicate ideas about text
  • More effectively monitor comprehension

Materials

Stellaluna big book

Clipboards with blank sheet of paper on it

Post-its for students

Large post-its for teacher

Small poster for teacher’s post-its

Pencils for students

Pre-assessment/Introduction

The teacher will ask questions eliciting background knowledge of students concerning bats and listening to their inner voice when reading.  Examples include: “What do you know about bats?”  “Do you ever hear your voice talking to you while reading a story?”  “What kind of thoughts do you have when reading?”  We are going to learn to take short notes of what we are thinking: questions that may pop into our heads, events or other books the story reminds us that are similar to the story, and our feelings and reactions to what we are reading.

 

Activity 1

Accomodations:  large book for ELL students or visually impaired, large post-its for the same reason, flexible open-ended learning activity for gifted and talented, separate carpet squares for each student to provide structure and distinct space for 504 students in group time area

  1.  Teacher begins reading story, stopping every page or two to model how she is thinking as she reads the story, jotting key words on a large post-it.  Post-its will be placed on small poster to serve as an example to the students when they use post-its later.  Example:  page 1 “This reminds me when we went to Congress Bridge to see the bats with my daughters’ Girl Scout troops.”
  2. Teacher continues modeling how to jot thoughts down on post-its as she reads.  After page 4 or 5, students will “Turn and Talk” to their neighbor to verbalize their own thoughts about the story so far.  Teacher allows plenty of time for students to share, while eliciting deeper thinking through open-ended questioning (Questions vary according to student responses).

Formative assessment:  Observe and listen to students.  Measure how well students understand how to connect to the story by listening to their inner thoughts.  Analyze student’s ability to communicate their ideas.  Decide whether to continue to next activity or continue working on current ability to personally connect with story.

 

Activity 2

 

Accomodations:  large book for ELL students or visually impaired, large post-its for the same reason, flexible open ended learning activity for gifted and talented students, separate carpet squares for each student to provide structure and distinct space for 504students in group time area, extra independent time to complete student assignment for SPED students

 

  1. Teacher continues reading story, stopping every page or two to model how she is thinking as she reads the story, jotting key words on large post-it to display on small poster.  Example: “Have you ever gone somewhere with your family and become lost?”
  2. Teacher continues modeling.  After approximately page 10, teacher stops.  Teacher gives instructions, then passes out clipboards and post-its. “Remember, write your name on your paper.” Students will write their responses to the story on post-its.

Extension:  If there is extra time, students will share and discuss their written thoughts with one another.  Otherwise, it will be covered in the next lesson.

Formative assessment:  Teacher will review papers to determine if students have achieved objectives.  Whether students have mastered this concept will determine if the remainder of Stellaluna will be used to teach organization of thoughts (labeling post-its as ?, Text –to –self, text-to-text, R = reminds me as taught in Strategies that Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement) or remain on this concept longer.

 

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